Fraud Pursue a Certain Course of Action

Fraud to be fraudulent, a false statement must relate to a material fact. It should also substantially affect a person’s decision to enter into a contract or Fraud pursue a certain course of action. In Fraud a false statement of fact that does not bear on the disputed transaction will not be considered fraudulent. Second, in Fraud the defendant must know that the statement is untrue.

A statement of fact that is simply mistaken is in Fraud is not fraudulent. In Fraud to be fraudulent, a false statement must be made with intent to deceive the victim. Fraud is perhaps the easiest element to prove, once falsity and materiality are proved, because in Fraud most material false statements are designed to mislead. Third, in Fraud the false statement must be made with the intent to deprive the victim of some legal right. Fourth, the victim’s reliance on the false statement in Fraud must be reasonable.

In Fraud Reliance on a patently absurd false statement generally will not give rise to fraud; however, people who are especially gullible, superstitious, or ignorant or who are illiterate may recover damages for fraud if the defendant knew and took advantage of their condition. Finally, in Fraud the false statement must cause the victim some injury that leaves her or him in a worse position than she or he was in before the fraud.

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